SIRIUS provides a set of components used to build modular and scalable Java applications.

SIRIUS was created by scireum GmbH as foundation of our web based Applications. Being advocates of open source software, we decided that a stable and reliable framework, used in production environments might be useful to others. The library is split into several modules to make it useful for different audiences.

GitHub JavaDoc

Design Aspects

KISS
Keep it simple and stupid: No classloader ticks. No magic implicit variables coming from god knows where. No bytecode rewriting. No layers of indirection if not needed.
Mind your IDE

SIRIUS can be started in any IDE/Debugger just like any normal Java appplication. As no classloader or bytecode magic is used, class reloading in the VM works a treat.

To further save precious developer time, the framework starts ultra fast. Having a server up and running in less than two seconds drives productivity above level 9000!

Maintainability
Having a microkernel based dependency injector at its heart, SIRIUS provides elegant modularization and permits easy extensibility of frameworks and applications.
Made for Production

Running critical servers in production environments forces you to instantly know, what's going on in the system. The exception handling system provided by SIRIUS provides excellent insight, while neither getting jammed by reoccurring errors nor missing any important message. Leveraging the dependency injection framework, every application creator can decide where and how to collect those errors.

Using the built-in profiler, central activities can be profiled in running production systems with almost no overhead.

Modules

Kernel

Provides common tool classes, core frameworks and the microkernel based dependency injector.

Web

Uses netty to provide a high performance web server, with an MVC framework (using Rythm as template engine) and a REST service layer which provides XML or JSON services.

App

Uses IceFaces (JSF) and Hibernate to provide a rapid application development platform permitting to build business applications quickly.

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Examples

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Examples

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Dependency Injection

Forms the core of the framework. Being a microkernel, the "magic" code is quite small, and can be easily extended.

Docs | Source
HTTP

Uses netty to setup a HTTP server supporting keepalive, chunked transfers, smart upload handling, connection monitoring, and a firewall.

Docs | Source

The app module is quite big and currently depends on a servlet container. Therefore it will take some time to port it. Therefore no features are ready yet - just some parts of the servlet emulation layer.

Async

Provides Async execution of tasks while passing along the CallContext.

Docs | Source
MVC

Provides a simple but powerful MVC framework for building RESTful web applications.

Docs | Source
Health

Provides central exception handling, logging and statistics tools.

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Services

Provides a container for REST services which can generate JSON or XML.

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NLS

Provides the i18n framework enabling native language support.

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JDBC

Provides a super thin layer above JDBC adding idiot-proof connection management, DBCP as connection pool as well as profiling for all queries.

Docs | Source

Projects using SIRIUS

  • S3 ninja uses the kernel and web module to provide an emulator for the S3 object store API.
  • OpenCobra provides a platform for gathering and visualizing measurements in an SWT based GUI. It uses the kernel module to provide an extensible architecture.
  • scireum GmbH uses SIRIUS for all of their Java based software projects, including cloud based web applications and e-commerce systems.

How to use it

The easiest and best way to include SIRIUS is to check it out as git sub module in the folder /sirius. Depending on which modules you plan to used, add the appropriate src and resources folders as java source folders.

Next create an Ant build file (build.xml) in a new sub folder "build" referencing the build-base.xml of SIRIUS. (Have a look at the example S3ninja: build.xml).

Now create an Ivy build file (ivy.xml) in the build folder, referencing the ivy files of the modules used. Yes, this is a bit ugly as you have to used XML entities, but it works. (See: ivy.xml for inspiration).

Finally run the ivy target using ANT to retrieve all required dependencies. This will create a lib folder beneath the build folder, which needs to be added to be build path. For internal projects, we even commit this folder to git, so that no one needs to go through that process again, unless the dependencies change.

Once a new feature of SIRIUS is available you're interested in, simply update the sub module to point to the specific commit (tag, branch, ...) and you're done.

Contribute

Contributions are welcome - the source code is available on GitHub: https://github.com/scireum/sirius
License
The MIT License (MIT)

Copyright (c) 2013 scireum GmbH

Permission is hereby granted, free of charge, to any person obtaining a copy of
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the Software, and to permit persons to whom the Software is furnished to do so,
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The above copyright notice and this permission notice shall be included in all
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S3 ninja is made with all the love in the world by scireum in Remshalden
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